Mike Healey Exhibition

QUESTION WHAT HAVE THE FOLLOWING IN COMMON? WEIRDLY BEAUTIFUL GARDENS – GREEK MYTHOLOGY REINVENTED – CORN DOLLIES – ARIEL AND CALIBAN – SHAKESPEARE’S ‘THE TEMPEST’ – STAGE DESIGNER EDWARD GORDON CRAIG – REMOTE TUNISIAN BEACHES – QUEEN MAB – DIONYSUS – PERSEPHONE’S MOTHER – MANDRAKES – FREE WILL – JOHN

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Object of the Week: Grocer’s Bike

This week our Archaeology Curator, Morag Clement, talks about the Grocer’s bike in our collection. This Grocer’s bicycle is a Safety bicycle modified with a basket holder at the front. The first successful Safety bicycle, called the Rover, was invented in 1885 by John Kemp Starley. They possessed a few features

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Colin Reynolds Cyanotype Workshop

Colin Reynolds offers an opportunity to join his workshop on the last day of his exhibition “Urban Etchings”. The workshop is on Saturday 30th July, 1pm to 3pm. The cost is £20 per person, or £30 per a family of an adult and two children. It will be plant prints

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Object of the Week: Helsfell Wolf

This week, our Curator of Collections, Carol Davies, talks about “Helsfell Wolf”. Kendal Museum’s Helsfell wolf skeleton was excavated in 1880 by John Beecham a local archaeology enthusiast who lived in Kendal. Beecham wanted the specimens he discovered to be placed in the care of Kendal Museum. The skeleton has been

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Object of the Week: Mollusc and Graptolite

This week, our Curator of Collections, Carol Davies, talks about “Mollusc” and “Graptolite”. Mollusc Molluscs are a group of animals without backbones(invertebrates) that have an unsegmented body, often covered by a shell(exceptions include octopuses and squid). Most molluscs are marine animals that live in habitats from shallow coastal areas to deep

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Object of the Week; Trilobite

This week, our Curator of Collections, Carol Davies, talks about “Trilobite”, prior to Geo Week 2022. Trilobite lived in marine waters. Some trilobites could swim, others borrowed or crawled around on muddy sea floors. The smallest trilobites were in cm or less in size. The largest trilobites were more than 70cm

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Object of the Week: Brachiopods

This week, our Curator of Collections, Carol Davies, talks about Brachiopods. Brachiopods are benthic (bottom dwelling), marine (ocean), bivalves (having two shells). They are considered living fossils, with 3 orders present in today’s oceans. They are rare today but during the Palaeozoic era (248–545 million years ago), they dominated the

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Object of the Week: Georgian Fans

This week our curator, Morag Clement, talks about “Georgian Fans”. Fans were a most desirable fashion accessory in Georgian times and depending on your wealth and status were made with ornate and indulgent materials such as tortoise shell, mother of pearl, gold and even ivory. Many fans would also have

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Viking Crafts Workshop -Bone Carving Course

History The Viking Age is generally deemed to have lasted from the 8th century – 11th century. The Vikings originated in Norway, Demark and Sweden but spread out to many countries to trade, settle and occasionally raid. Their primary occupation however was farming. Like us today, they needed all sorts

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Object of the Week: Silver Short Cross Pennies

This week our curator, Morag Clement, talks about “Thirty Four Silver Short Cross Pennies”. The coins were found near Carnforth in 2008 by a local metal detectorist. After examination at the British Museum, they were declared Treasure Trove and Kendal Museum was given the option to purchase them. A value

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